Outstanding Alumni

  

A Selection of Outstanding University of Utah Alumni

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A-C

Ross “Rocky” Anderson BA’73, former mayor of Salt Lake City
Anderson, who served as mayor of Salt Lake City from 2000 to 2008, has been recognized by numerous organizations for his leadership on global warming. He is currently executive director of High Road for Human Rights, devoted to preventing and eliminating human rights abuses around the world. In early 2012, he launched a new national political party, the Justice Party, and became its U.S. presidential nominee.

Rocky Anderson

Ross “Rocky” Anderson BA’73, former  mayor of Salt Lake City
A. Scott Anderson ex’69, president and CEO of Zions First National Bank
Anderson is president and chief executive officer of Zions First National Bank, and was recognized as CEO of the Year in 2006 by Utah Business magazine.

A. Scott Anderson

A. Scott Anderson ex’69, president and CEO of Zions First National Bank
Alan Ashton BA’66 PhD’70, co-founder of WordPerfect Corporation
Ashton, co-founder of WordPerfect Corporation, has also served as a professor at Brigham Young University, and is founder (with his wife) of Thanksgiving Point in Lehi, Utah.

Alan Ashton

Alan Ashton BA’66 PhD’70, co-founder of WordPerfect  Corporation
Terrel H. Bell EdD’61, former U.S. Secretary of Education
Bell served as acting U.S. Commissioner of Education, 1970-71; U.S. Commissioner of Education, 1974-76; and U.S. Secretary of Education, 1981-85 (in the cabinet of President Ronald Reagan).
Robert F. Bennett BS’57, former U.S. Senator from Utah
Recently retired from public service after serving his third term as a U.S. Senator, Bennett got his start in politics by managing his father’s Senate reelection campaign in 1962. (Wallace F. Bennett was a U.S. Senator from 1951 to 1974.) Bennett followed in his father’s footsteps with a successful campaign in 1992; but in 2010, he placed third in the Republican caucus and is not eligible for re-election in November.
Jim Blinn PhD’78, groundbreaking computer scientist who devised bump mapping
A graphics fellow at Microsoft Research since 1995, Blinn devised environment mapping and bump mapping, new methods to represent how objects and light interact in a 3-D virtual world. He is also known for his work on the pre-encounter animations for the Voyager project and his work on the Carl Sagan Cosmos documentary series.

Jim Blinn

Jim Blinn PhD’78, groundbreaking computer scientist who  devised bump mapping
Andrew Bogut ex’05, No. 1 in NBA draft pick in 2005
Bogut was consensus national player of the year in 2005, earning all five awards recognized by the NCAA, and was selected No. 1 in the NBA draft by the Milwaukee Bucks. In 2006, he became the seventh Ute player to have his number (4) retired and a marker hung in the University’s Huntsman Center.

Andrew Bogut

Andrew Bogut ex’05, No. 1 in NBA draft pick in 2005
Nolan Bushnell BS’69, co-founder of Atari and inventor of Pong
Bushnell is considered father of the video game industry as co-founder of Atari and inventor of Pong. He also founded the Chuck E. Cheese pizza and video game restaurants. Learn more in the Continuum feature here

 

Nolan Bushnell

Nolan Bushnell BS’69, co-founder of Atari and inventor of Pong
Orson Scott Card MA’81, one of the country’s premier science-fiction authors

Card is one of the country’s premier science-fiction authors. His books Ender’s Game and its sequel Speaker of the Dead both received Hugo (international) and Nebula (national) awards for best science fiction. The honors are two of the most prestigious in the genre. 

Orson Scott Card

Orson Scott Card MA’81, one of the country’s premier science-fiction authors
Ron Carlson BA’70 MA’72, award-winning author of fiction
Carlson has written 10 books of fiction, including the short story collections The Hotel Eden (1997), named Notable Book of the Year, and At the Jim Bridger (2002), selected as one of the best books of the year by The Los Angeles Times. His work has been published in magazines including Esquire, Harper’s, and The New Yorker, and anthologies such as The Best American Short Stories and The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Fiction. He has been recognized with a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Fiction and the Pushcart Prize, and published the essay collection Ron Carlson Writes A Story in 2007. Learn more in the Continuum feature here.  

 

Ron Carlson

Ron Carlson BA’70 MA’72, award-winning author of fiction
Ed Catmull BS’69 PhD’74, co-founder and president of Pixar Animation Studios
Co-founder and president of Pixar Animation Studios, also president of Disney Feature Animation since 2006, Catmull has been honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with Scientific and Technical Engineering Awards and shared an Oscar for development of software used in the Toy Story films as well as in A Bug’s Life, Jurassic Park, Titanic, and Gladiator. Pixar's first 10 feature films, through Toy Story 3, have garnered 36 Academy Award® nominations, 10 Oscars®, seven Golden Globes® and numerous other accolades. Toy Story 3 won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature in 2010. Learn more in the Continuum feature here

 

Ed Catmull

Ed Catmull BS’69 PhD’74, co-founder and president of Pixar Animation Studios
Tom Chambers ex’77, an NBA star during the 1980s and 1990s
At the U of U, Chambers played center with star forward Danny Vranes, and the two led successful teams in the Western Athletic Conference. The San Diego Clippers took Chambers eighth overall in the 1981 NBA Draft. He went on to play for teams including the Seattle Supersonics, Phoenix Suns, and Utah Jazz.

Top Chambers

Tom Chambers ex’77, an NBA star during the 1980s and 1990s
Jim Clark PhD’74, co-founder of Silicon Graphics Inc. and Netscape
Clark is co-founder of Silicon Graphics Inc. and Netscape, and founder of Healtheon (which later merged with WebMD), Shutterfly.com, and MyCFO Inc. 

Jim Clark

Jim Clark PhD’74, co-founder of Silicon Graphics Inc. and Netscape
Katharine Coles PhD'90, former Utah Poet Laureate
Coles, a noted author and poet with numerous publications to her credit, was named to a five-year term as Utah's Poet Laureate in 2006. She is currently a professor of English at the University of Utah and director of the Harriet Monroe Poetry Institute at the Poetry Foundation in Chicago. 

 

Katharine Coles

Katharine Coles PhD'90, former Utah Poet Laureate
Stephen Covey BS’53, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
Covey is a business consultant, best-selling author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and other books, founder of the former Covey Leadership Center, and vice-chair of FranklinCovey Co., a management and leadership development firm. 

Stephen Covey

Stephen Covey BS’53, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
Keene Curtis BA’47 MS’51, Tony Award-winning actor
Curtis is a late Tony Award-winning actor who appeared on Broadway in La Cage Aux Folles and in Annie as Daddy Warbucks; in films Heaven Can Wait, Macbeth, Sliver, Blade, and American Hot Wax; and on TV shows Cheers, M*A*S*H, Hawaii Five-0, ER, and Ally McBeal.

Keene Curtis

Keene Curtis BA’47 MS’51, Tony Award-winning actor

D-G

France Davis MA'78, vice president to the educational arm of the National Baptist Convention
The Rev. France Davis MA’78, pastor at Salt Lake City’s Calvary Baptist Church for nearly a quarter century, serves as the fifth vice president to the educational arm of the National Baptist Convention. Davis, who holds five degrees and teaches communication and ethnic studies at the University of Utah, is believed to be the first from Utah to receive the designation. He has received numerous awards for his leadership and teaching, has established a scholarship at the U in his name, and is the author of Light in the Midst of Zion and an autobiography, France Davis: An American Story Told, which received the 2006 Utah Book Award in nonfiction.

 

France Davis

France Davis MA'78, vice president to the educational arm of the National Baptist Convention
Michael Doleac BS'02, former U basketball standout
A standout basketball player at the University of Utah, Doleac was selected 12th overall in the 1998 NBA Draft by the Orlando Magic. He spent a decade in the NBA, helping the Miami Heat win the championship in 2006 before retiring in 2008. In 2009, Doleac became a graduate manager for the University of Utah men’s basketball team and a graduate student in physics.

 

Michael Doleac

Michael Doleac BS'02, former U basketball standout
Spencer F. Eccles BS’56, chair, Wells Fargo & Co. Intermountain Banking Region
Eccles is chair of Wells Fargo & Co. Intermountain Banking Region, and former chair and chief executive officer of the First Security Corp. He is also president of the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation, the largest philanthropic foundation in Utah.

Spencer F. Eccles

Spencer F. Eccles BS’56, chair, Wells Fargo & Co. Intermountain Banking Region
Larry Echohawk JD'73, Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs
Echohawk, an attorney and legal scholar, joined the administration of U.S. President Barack Obama on May 9, 2009 as the 10th Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs. He served as Attorney General of Idaho from 1991 to 1995, the first Native American elected to a constitutional statewide office, and was formerly on the law faculty at Brigham Young University. 

Larry Echohawk

Larry Echohawk JD'73, Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs
LaVell Edwards MS’60, former Brigham Young University head football coach
Edwards played football for Utah State University then attended graduate school at the University of Utah before joining Brigham Young University as head football coach, a position he held from 1972-2000. In 1984, Edwards’ BYU Cougars went 13–0 and won the national championship. The BYU stadium is named in his honor.

LaVell Edwards

LaVell Edwards MS’60, former Brigham Young University head football coach
Lily Eskelsen BS’80 MEd’86, vice president of the National Education Association
Eskelsen was named Utah Teacher of the Year in 1989 and won a write-in election as president of the Utah Education Association in 1990. In 1998 she was the first Hispanic to be chosen as her party’s nominee for U.S. Congress in Utah. In 2008, she was elected vice president of the National Education Association.

Lily Eskelson

Lily Eskelsen BS’80 MEd’86, vice president of the National Education Association
David C. Evans BA’49 PhD’53, groundbreaking computer scientist who co-founded Evans & Sutherland
Evans founded the computer graphics department at the University of Utah, and later co-founded Evans & Sutherland, a pioneer in computer graphics, aircraft flight simulators, and other virtual reality products. Learn more in the Continuum feature here

 

David C. Evans

David C. Evans BA’49 PhD’53, groundbreaking computer scientist who co-founded Evans & Sutherland
Richard Paul Evans ex’87, best-selling author of The Christmas Box
The best-selling author of The Christmas Box, The 5 Lessons A Millionaire Taught Me, and The Gift, Evans also founded The Christmas Box House International, an organization devoted to building shelters and providing services for abused and neglected children. 

Richard Paul Evans

Richard Paul Evans ex’87, best-selling author of The Christmas Box
Arnie Ferrin BS’66, 1948 draft pick for the Minneapolis Lakers and the only four-time All-American in Utah basketball history
Ferrin, an award-winning University of Utah basketball player, was a 1948 draft pick for the Minneapolis Lakers, which won two NBA championships when Ferrin was on the team. Ferrin is the only four-time All-American in Utah basketball history. In 2005 he received an honorary degree from the U, and in 2008 he was named to the College Basketball Hall of Fame. In 2012, he was inducted into the Pac-12 Basketball Hall of Honor. 

Arnie Ferrin

Arnie Ferrin BS’66, 1948 draft pick for the Minneapolis Lakers and the only four-time All-American in Utah basketball history
Mark Fuller BS’76, president and CEO of WET Design, creator of the Bellagio Hotel fountains
A former Disney Imagineer, Fuller is president and CEO of WET Design, the water feature design firm responsible for such notable creations as the 2002 Salt Lake Winter Olympics Cauldron, and the Bellagio Hotel fountains and the Mirage Hotel Volcano in Las Vegas.

Mark Fuller

Mark Fuller BS’76, president and CEO of WET Design, creator of the Bellagio Hotel fountains
E.J. “Jake" Garn BS’55, former senator
A Republican Senator from Utah, 1975-93, Garn was also the first public official to fly aboard the Space Shuttle, a seven-day flight of Discovery in November 1984. 

E.J. "Jake" Garn

E.J. “Jake
E. Gordon Gee BA’68, president of The Ohio State University
In 2007, named the 14th president of The Ohio State University (where he previously served as president from 1990 to 1997), Gee is also former president of the University of Colorado, Brown University, and West Virginia University, and a former chancellor of Vanderbilt University. He was recognized with an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Utah in 2010.

 

E. Gordon Gee

E. Gordon Gee BA’68, president of The Ohio State University
Larry D. Gluth BS’83, a VP with Habitat for Humanity
Larry is an advocate for Hurricane Katrina survivors and the Gulf Coast community. Gluth began his career at Starbucks and eventually led the company's food services division as vice president. After taking a year's sabbatical to assist Habitat for Humanity's work in the Gulf Coast following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, Gluth realized his passion was to serve others. He relocated with his wife, Gailynn, and young son, Connor, to Atlanta, where he is now the vice president of the U.S. and Canada area office for Habitat Humanity International. 
Wilbert “Bill” Gore BS’33 MS’35, inventor of GORE-TEX fabric
A DuPont chemist (deceased) who, with his wife Genevieve, founded W. L. Gore & Associates in 1958 and invented GORE-TEX fabric, which is used for waterproof and breathable mountaineering clothing. Gore products also include synthetic blood vessels as well as wires and cables that landed on the moon. 
William R. Gould BS’42, utility executive who helped pioneer the widespread use of renewable power and energy conservation
Gould, former president, chair, and chief executive officer of Southern California Edison, was a visionary utility executive who helped pioneer the now commonly accepted use of renewable power and energy conservation to meet California’s electricity needs
Henri Gouraud PhD’71, groundbreaking computer scientist who invented Gouraud shading
Born in France, Gouraud is the inventor of Gouraud shading used in computer graphics. At the U, he worked with Dave Evans and Ivan Sutherland on his dissertation, titled Computer Display of Curved Surfaces.
  

H-L

Elizabeth Hale Hammond BS’64
Elizabeth is an expert in cardiac-transplantation pathology and predictive cancer-factor evaluation. An internationally known researcher, educator, and author, Hammond has published three books, 15 book chapters, and 165 papers in peer-reviewed medical journals. She is currently a pathologist at Intermountain Health Care and a professor of pathology and adjunct professor in internal medicine at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Hammond has received national recognition and numerous awards for her work, including Pathologist of the Year, the highest honor the College of American Pathologists can bestow. 
Ann Weaver Hart BS’70 MA’81 PhD’83, president of the University of Arizona
Hart was named president of UA in February 2012. She had been president of Temple University, a public university in Philadelphia, since 2006. Hart previously held positions including four years as president of the University of New Hampshire, and five years as provost and vice president for academic affairs at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, Calif. 

Ann Weaver Hart

Ann Weaver Hart BS’70 MA’81 PhD’83, president of the University of Arizona
Gordon B. Hinckley BA’32, 15th president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Hinckley served as the much-beloved 15th president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from March 12, 1995, until his death at age 97 on January 27, 2008. 

Gordon B. Hinckley

Gordon B. Hinckley BA’32, 15th president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Jon M. Huntsman, Jr. ex’85, former U.S. Ambassador to China and former governor of Utah
Twice elected as governor of Utah, Huntsman was named U.S. ambassador to China in May 2009. In early 2012, he was named to succeed his father, Jon Huntsman, Sr., as chair of the Huntsman Cancer Foundation, which supports the University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute. Huntsman’s public service career began as a White House staff assistant to President Ronald Reagan and has also included appointments as deputy assistant secretary of commerce for Asia and U.S. ambassador to Singapore. He was recognized with an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Utah in 2010. 

Jon M. Huntsman, Jr.

Jon M. Huntsman, Jr. ex’85, former U.S. Ambassador to China and former governor of Utah
Mickey Ibarra MEd’80, former White House director of intergovernmental affairs and assistant to President William J. Clinton.
Ibarra served as White House director of intergovernmental affairs and as an assistant to former President William J. Clinton. He was named a U of U Distinguished Alumnus in 2001 and received an honorary doctorate of humane letters from the U in 2007. In 2012, he received the inaugural Medallion For Excellence in Government Relations and Public Affairs from the United States Hispanic Leadership Institute.

Mickey Ibarra

Mickey Ibarra MEd’80, former White House director of intergovernmental affairs and assistant to President William J. Clinton.
Robert K. Jarvik MD’76, namesake of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart
Jarvik is credited as inventor of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart, which surgeon William DeVries implanted in 1982 in Seattle dentist Barney Clark, who survived 112 days. 
Alan C. Kay MS’68 PhD’69, groundbreaking computer scientist who innovated the overlapping windows concept for PCs
Kay played a major role in development of the personal computer, the concept of the first laptop computer (known as the Dynabook), and as an architect of the “graphical user interface” in which overlapping windows appear on a computer screen, making PCs easy to use.

Alan C. Kay

Alan C. Kay MS’68 PhD’69, groundbreaking computer scientist who innovated the overlapping windows concept for PCs
Fred Kempe BA’76, president and CEO of The Atlantic Council of the United States
Kempe, currently president and CEO of The Atlantic Council of the United States, spent nearly 30 years with the Wall Street Journal, where he won national and international prizes while serving in numerous capacities—editor, associate publisher, columnist and correspondent. Previously he was editor and associate publisher of the Wall Street Journal Europe and was European editor for the global Wall Street Journal from 2002 to 2005, also overseeing Middle Eastern reporting.

Fred Kempe

Fred Kempe BA’76, president and CEO of The Atlantic Council of the United States
Richard E. Kendell MEd’70 PhD’73, former Utah Commissioner of Higher Education
Kendell has dedicated his life to education. Recently retired as Utah's Commissioner of Higher Education, Kendell was previously executive director of the Utah Partnership for Education, deputy to the governor for education and economic development, and superintendent of schools for the Davis School District. He has also taught and served as an administrator at the University of Utah. 
Kay Atkinson King BA’64, director of the Office of Interparliamentary Affairs for the U.S. House of Representatives
Appointed by Speaker Nancy Pelosi as director of the Office of Interparliamentary Affairs for the U.S. House of Representatives in 2007, King has worked for Congress since 1984, most recently as Democratic Senior Policy Advisor to the House Committee on Foreign Affairs.
Tom C. Korologos BA’55, a strategic advisor to the Washington, D.C., office of the law firm DLA Piper.
Korologos has served as an assistant to two presidents, a senior staff member in the U.S. Congress, and a member of both the U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy and the Broadcasting Board of Governors. In 2008, he was named a strategic advisor to the Washington, D.C., office of the law firm DLA Piper. Previously, he served as U.S. ambassador to Belgium, from July 2004 to February 2007. 

Tom C. Korologos

Tom C. Korologos BA’55, a strategic advisor to the Washington, D.C., office of the law firm DLA Piper.
Akhlesh Lakhtakia MS’81 PhD’83, groundbreaking scientist in electromagnetic fields and waves
Charles G. Binder Endowed Professor of Engineering Science & Mechanics at The Pennsylvania State University and a visiting professor of Physics at Imperial College London, Lakhtakia is widely recognized for his groundbreaking research on nanotechnology and on the behavior of electromagnetic fields and waves in complex materials. In 2007, he was recognized by the U of U Alumni Association as a Distinguished Alumnus during its annual Founders Day celebration.

Akhlesh Lakhtakia

Akhlesh Lakhtakia MS’81 PhD’83, groundbreaking scientist in electromagnetic fields and waves
H. Blaine Lindgren BS’62, a silver medalist in the 1964 Olympics
Lindgren competed for the United States in the1964 Summer Olympics held in Tokyo, Japan, in the 110 meter hurdles. Lindgren was the first to cross the finish line, but because he leaned too soon, he crossed under the tape. The Olympics rule book at the time indicated that the athlete who broke the tape was the winner. Thus, after some confusion, officials awarded the gold medal to Lindgren’s teammate, Hayes Jones. 

H. Blaine Lindgren

H. Blaine Lindgren BS’62, a silver medalist in the 1964 Olympics
  

M-O

Missy Marlowe BS’94, champion collegiate gymnast and Olympic competitor
Marlowe was just 17 when she competed as a gymnast at the 1988 Summer Olympic Games in Seoul, South Korea. She began her freshman year at the U the following January, in 1989. She went on to become the 1992 NCAA All-Around Champion.

Missy Marlowe

Missy Marlowe BS’94, champion collegiate gymnast and Olympic competitor
J. Willard Marriott BA’26 and J. Willard Marriott Jr. BA’54, founder of and successor to the Marriott hospitality company
Marriott, Sr. founded Marriott International, Inc., a worldwide hospitality company that had its origins when he and his wife, Alice S. Marriott BA’27, opened a nine-seat root beer stand in Washington, D.C., in 1927; he died in 1985. Marriott, Jr. succeeded his father as chief executive officer of Marriott Corp. in 1972. 
Robert “Bob” McDonald MBA’78, chair, president and CEO of Procter & Gamble
McDonald was named president and chief executive officer of Procter & Gamble in July 2009 and chair of the board in early 2010. He graduated in the top 2% of his West Point class and served as a captain in the U.S. Army for five years before joining P&G in 1980. 

Robert “Bob” McDonald

Robert “Bob” McDonald MBA’78, chair, president and CEO of Procter & Gamble
Bobby McFerrin ex’78, 10-time Grammy Award-winning vocalist and composer
Best known for his 1988 hit song “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” (which won Song of the Year and Record of the Year honors), McFerrin is a 10-time Grammy Award-winning vocalist and composer. He has collaborated with performers including pianists Chick Corea, Herbie Hancock, and Yo-Yo Ma.
David Oman McKay BS 1897, ninth president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The ninth president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (1951-1970), McKay guided the post-World War II church through a critical period of transition. He was recognized with awards and honors including a Special Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Utah Alumni Association in 1970, the year he died.

David Oman McKay

David Oman McKay BS 1897, ninth president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
L. Ralph Mecham BS’51 MPA’51, director of the Administrative Office of the United States Courts for more than 20 years
Mecham served under three chief justices and occupied the position of director of the Administrative Office of the United States Courts for more than 20 years, longer than any other director in the history of the office. In recognition, the primary conference facility in the Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building was named in his honor.
Wataru “Wat” Misaka BS’48, the first person of color in what eventually became the NBA
The 5’7” Misaka was key to the University of Utah’s miraculous drives to 1944 and 1947 national championships. Known for his speed and agility, despite his small size, he later played for the New York Knicks, becoming the only Japanese-American to have played professional basketball at the highest level in the United States. Read "That's Just How It Was" (Continuum, Spring 2010).

Wataru “Wat” Misaka

Wataru “Wat” Misaka BS’48, the first person of color in what eventually became the NBA
Hanno Mottola BA’00, Utah basketball champion and former NBA player
The fourteenth all-time basketball scorer in U of U history, Mottola was the first Finnish national to play in a regular-season NBA game. He previously played as a forward for the Atlanta Hawks and joined the Finnish team Torpan Pojat in September 2009.
John Naisbitt BA’52, best-selling author, served in two presidential administrations
Naisbitt is author of the best-selling Megatrends, Global Paradox, Megatrends for Women: From Liberation to Leadership (with Patricia Aburdene), and other books, including European and Asian best sellers. A former executive with IBM and Eastman Kodak, Naisbitt served as assistant secretary of education under President John F. Kennedy and as a special assistant to President Lyndon B. Johnson. 

John Naisbitt

John Naisbitt BA’52, best-selling author, served in two presidential administrations
David Neeleman ex’81, founder and former CEO of JetBlue Airways
Brazilian-born Neeleman co-founded Morris Air and continued as an executive after its acquisition by Southwest Airlines. After leaving Southwest, he founded JetBlue, leaving it to found the Brazilian domestic carrier Azul Linhas Aéreas Brasileiras.

David Neeleman

David Neeleman ex’81, founder and former CEO of JetBlue Airways
John C. Nelson MD’69 MPH’93, adviser to the National Institutes of Health
Nelson, FACOG, FACPM, is a member of the Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). A board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist from Salt Lake City, Nelson is also a past president of the American Medical Association.
Martin Newell PhD’75, groundbreaking computer scientist who created the Utah teapot
The British-born Newell is perhaps best known as the creator of the Utah teapot, a significant advance in 3-D rendering. At Xerox PARC, he worked on JaM, a predecessor of PostScript. JaM stood for “John and Martin”—the John was John Warnock, co-founder of Adobe Systems. Newell retired as an Adobe Fellow at Adobe Systems. 
John Nogawski BS’82, a president and chief operating officer for CBS Television Distribution
Nogawski was previously president of CBS Paramount Domestic Television, where he helmed sales efforts for first-run series including Entertainment Tonight and The Insider, as well as off-network launches for Medium, NCIS, and Frasier.

John Nogawski

John Nogawski BS’82, a president and chief operating officer for CBS Television Distribution
Raymond J. Noorda BS’49, former president, CEO and chair of Novell Inc.
The former president, chief executive officer and chair of Novell Inc., Noorda grew the company into a powerhouse as its CEO from 1983-1995. He is known as the “Father of Network Computing” for helping grow the emerging technology to today’s level.
Josephine “Jody” K. Olsen BS’65, former deputy director of the Peace Corps
Olsen, now a visiting professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Social Work, served as deputy director of the Peace Corps for the previous seven years after having begun her distinguished international career in 1966 as a volunteer in Tunisia.

Josephine “Jody” K. Olsen

Josephine “Jody” K. Olsen BS’65, former deputy director of the Peace Corps
Gerold Ottley MFA’67, former musical director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir
Ottley was music director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir from 1974 to 1999. Under his direction, the choir received honors including two Emmy Awards and two Platinum records. Just prior to his appointment with the choir, he served as the assistant chair of the U of U School of Music.

Gerold Ottley

Gerold Ottley MFA’67, former musical director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir
  

P-S

Bui Tuong Phong PhD’73, groundbreaking computer scientist
Phong is the inventor of the Phong reflection model and the Phong shading interpolation method. Phong was terminally ill with leukemia while a student. In 1975, Phong joined Stanford as a professor. He died not long after finishing his dissertation.
Martha Raddatz ex’75, chief foreign correspondent for ABC News
Raddatz reports for ABC’s World News with Diane Sawyer (formerly World News with Charles Gibson), Nightline, and other network broadcasts. Raddatz has written for The New Republic and is a frequent guest on PBS’s Washington Week. 

Martha Raddatz

Martha Raddatz ex’75, chief foreign correspondent for ABC News
Simon Ramo BS’33, chief scientist in the development of America’s intercontinental ballistic missiles
Ramo was the “R” in the technology and aerospace company TRW Inc., formed by the 1958 merger of Thompson Products and Ramo-Wooldridge Corp. 

Simon Ramo

Simon Ramo BS’33, chief scientist in the development of America’s intercontinental ballistic missiles
Calvin L. Rampton BS’36 JD’40, Utah’s only three-term governor
Rampton, a Democrat, held office from 1965 to 1977. He also served as chair of the Education Commission of the States and the National Governors Conference, and as president of the Council of State Governments. The Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City was named in his honor. Read "A Statesman for All Seasons" (Continuum, Summer 2006).

Calvin L. Rampton

Calvin L. Rampton BS’36 JD’40, Utah’s only three-term governor
Thomas D. Rees BA’46 MD’48, co-founder of the Flying Doctors Service of East Africa
Co-founder of the Flying Doctors Service of East Africa (introducing reconstructive surgery to the region), which evolved into the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF). Rees is a clinical professor of plastic surgery at New York University School of Medicine and senior surgeon at the Institute for Reconstructive Surgery. 

Thomas D. Rees

Thomas D. Rees BA’46 MD’48, co-founder of the Flying Doctors Service of East Africa
Shane Robison BS’80 MS’83, executive with Hewlett Packard
Robison is executive vice president and chief strategy and technology officer for Hewlett Packard, and a member of the Utah Information Technology Association Hall of Fame. in 2004, InfoWorld declared Robison one of the world's 25 most influential chief technology officers. He was recognized with an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Utah in 2010.

Shane Robison

Shane Robison BS’80 MS’83, executive with Hewlett Packard
William J. Rutter MS’50, an innovator in biotech
Rutter is a leader in biotechnology research. His work at the University of California, San Francisco, and Chiron, the biotech firm he co-founded more than 25 years ago, led to several early advances in biotechnology, including the first cloning of the insulin gene, the development of a process for making a vaccine against the hepatitis B virus, and research leading to the first sequencing of the HIV genome. 
John W. Ryan BA’51, former president of Indiana University
The founding chancellor of the University of Massachusetts at Boston, Ryan served Indiana University as a professor, vice president, chancellor of regional campuses and, for 16 years, as its president. He also held positions as interim president at Florida Atlantic University and the University of Maryland at Baltimore, and as chancellor of the State University of New York. 

John W. Ryan

John W. Ryan BA’51, former president of Indiana University
Cecil O. Samuelson, Jr. BS’66 MS’70 MD’70, president of Brigham Young University
President of Brigham Young University since May 2003, Samuelson is a former professor of medicine, dean of the School of Medicine, and vice president of Health Sciences at the University of Utah.

Cecil O. Samuelson, Jr.

Cecil O. Samuelson, Jr. BS’66 MS’70 MD’70, president of Brigham Young University
Rocco Siciliano BA’44, former Assistant Secretary of Labor and Special Assistant to President Eisenhower
A former assistant secretary of Labor and then special assistant to President Eisenhower for personnel management in the White House, Siciliano later served as Undersecretary of Commerce in the Nixon administration. He is currently chair of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission in Washington, D.C., and the Center for Governmental Studies in Los Angeles. Learn more in the short Continuum feature here.

Rocco Siciliano

Rocco Siciliano BA’44, former Assistant Secretary of Labor and Special Assistant to President Eisenhower
Alex Smith BS’04, No. 1 pick in the 2005 NFL draft
An award-winning former quarterback for the Utes, Smith was the No. 1 pick in the 2005 NFL draft, the highest pick ever from the state of Utah. He led the U of U football team to an 11-0 record for ‘04-05, which included a first-ever trip to (and win at) the Bowl Championship Series, before being drafted as a QB for the San Francisco 49ers.

Alex Smith

Alex Smith BS’04, No. 1 pick in the 2005 NFL draft
Kim Smith BA’06, former professional women’s basketball player
Smith was named the Mountain West Conference Player of the Year from 2003 through 2006. She is the first and still only woman to have her jersey number (No. 4) retired by the University of Utah. Smith was selected by the Sacramento Monarchs as the 13th overall pick during the first round of the 2006 WNBA Draft. On March 20, 2009, she was acquired by the Phoenix Mercury. In 2013, Smith returned to the U to lead the women's basketball team's community outreach efforts.

Kim Smith

Kim Smith BA’06, former professional women’s basketball player
Beverley Taylor Sorenson BS’45, a leader in arts education
Sorenson (who died in 2013) was a tireless advocate of arts education for children. In 1995, Sorenson, a former elementary school teacher, established the nonprofit foundation Art Works for Kids, dedicated to enriching the lives and improving the minds of Utah children through innovative arts education. In 2008, the Sorenson Legacy Foundation pledged a generous gift to support a groundbreaking new interdisciplinary program at the U that will train fine arts and education students to teach music, dance, visual arts, and theater in elementary school settings. Learn more in the Continuum feature here.
Shelby Steele PhD’75, award-winning author and documentarian
Steele is an author, columnist, documentary film maker, and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. In 1990, he received the National Book Critics Circle Award in the general nonfiction category for his book The Content of Our Character. He received Emmy and Writers Guild Awards for his 1991 Frontline documentary film Seven Days in Bensonhurst.

Shelby Steele

Shelby Steele PhD’75, award-winning author and documentarian
Wallace Stegner BA’30, acclaimed author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Angle of Repose
Stegner is a late American novelist whose writings exhibit his lifelong interest in the environment and the unique qualities of the American West. In 1960, he wrote his Wilderness Letter, on the importance of federal protection of wild places, which was used to introduce the bill that established the National Wilderness Preservation System in 1964. During the Kennedy administration, he served as assistant to the secretary of the interior. In 1972, his novel Angle of Repose won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction.

Wallace Stegner

Wallace Stegner BA’30, acclaimed author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Angle of Repose
Jane Summerhays BA’67, Drama Desk Award-winning and Tony Award-nominated actress
An actress in musical comedy, Summerhays won the Drama Desk Award in 1987 and was nominated for a Tony Award as “Best Featured Actress” in a musical for Me and My Girl. She has been involved in humanitarian projects such as the Broadway Musical Project–Tel Aviv/New York and the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation.

Jane Summerhays

Jane Summerhays BA’67, Drama Desk Award-winning and Tony Award-nominated actress
  

T-Z

Shona Thorburn BS’05, former professional women’s basketball player
Thorburn started every game in every season at the U and capped off her junior season as Co-Mountain West Player of the Year. She was taken by the Minnesota Lynx as the 7th Overall pick of the 2006 WNBA Draft. She later played as a point guard for the Seattle Storm of the WNBA.

Shona Thorburn

Shona Thorburn BS’05, former professional women’s basketball player
Laurel Thatcher Ulrich BA’60, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian who popularized the slogan “Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History”
Ulrich won the 1991 Pulitzer Prize in history for her 1991 book A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812, which revealed the prevalence of violence, crime, and premarital sex in 18th-century New England. A professor at Harvard, Ulrich has authored other books including Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History (2007), which is a phrase taken from a sentence in a 1976 Ulrich article that became one of the best-known slogans of modern feminism. Learn more in the Continuum feature here

 

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich BA’60, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian who popularized the slogan “Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History”
Andrew A. Valdez JD’77, a leading juvenile court judge
Andrew has devoted his adult life to helping young people in trouble. Currently a judge in Salt Lake City's Third District Juvenile Court, Valdez describes in his memoir how—growing up poor and fatherless—a chance friendship with a successful businessman helped him envision a previously unimaginable future for himself. Since his appointment to the Third District Juvenile Court, Valdez has developed a court-based mentoring program, partnerships with community education schools, and opportunities for female juvenile offenders to work off restitutionobligations. 
Keith Van Horn BS’97, the NBA’s No. 2 draft pick in 1997
Award-winning University basketball player and, in 1997, the NBA’s No. 2 draft pick for the Philadelphia 76ers. Now retired, he also played for NBA teams including the Milwaukee Bucks, the New York Knicks, and the Dallas Mavericks. 

Keith Van Horn

Keith Van Horn BS’97, the NBA’s No. 2 draft pick in 1997
Olene Walker PhD’87, first woman to serve as lieutenant governor and governor of Utah
First woman to serve as lieutenant governor (10 years) and governor (2003-05) of Utah. Walker was sworn into office as Utah’s 15th governor shortly before her 73rd birthday. Her background also includes eight years in the state legislature, including a term as Majority Whip. She also founded the Salt Lake Education Foundation and served as its director.

Olene Walker

Olene Walker PhD’87, first woman to serve as lieutenant governor and governor of Utah
John Warnock BS’61 MS’64 PhD’69, groundbreaking computer scientist who co-founded Adobe Systems
Co-founder and board chair of Adobe Systems, Inc., Warnock  first helped launch desktop publishing and then ushered in the “paperless” office, developing the PostScript software that enabled desktop computers and printers to create sophisticated page layouts for the first time, and later inventing the PDF. He has been recognized with numerous scientific and technical awards, including the Marconi Prize—the highest honor for work in information science and communications—and received the University of Utah Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1995. Learn more in the Continuum feature here

 

John Warnock

John Warnock BS’61 MS’64 PhD’69, groundbreaking computer scientist who co-founded Adobe Systems
Eric Weddle ex’06, professional NFL player
An award-winning U of U football player (including Defensive MVP of the 2005 Emerald Bowl and a consensus All-American in 2006), Weddle was taken as the 37th pick in the NFL Draft by the San Diego Chargers. In 48 games at Utah, Weddle started 45 times and set the school career record with nine forced fumbles. He has several other school records in the top 10.

Eric Weddle

Eric Weddle ex’06, professional NFL player
Brad Wilkins BA’01, architect on the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai
Wilkins is an award-winning architect who has worked on projects including the world’s tallest building (the Burj Khalifa in Dubai) and the world’s first zero-energy, supertall skyscraper (the Pearl River Tower in China). Formerly with Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, he is now senior designer at Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture.

Brad Wilkins

Brad Wilkins BA’01, architect on the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai
Terry Tempest Williams BS’79 MS’84, author of Refuge
Williams, nationally recognized as a writer, naturalist, and environmental activist, is the author of Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place (1991), An Unspoken Hunger: Stories from the Field (1994), Red: Passion and Patience in the Desert (2001), The Open Space of Democracy (2004), and other books, including the recent Finding Beauty in a Broken World and Illuminated Desert (both 2008). She is currently the Annie Clark Tanner Scholar in Environmental Humanities at the University of Utah.

Terry Tempest Williams

Terry Tempest Williams BS’79 MS’84, author of Refuge
Evelyn Wood BA’29 MA’47, speed-reading innovator
Speed-reading innovator inspired by C. Lowell Lees, chair of the University of Utah’s speech and theater department from 1943-1964; developed Reading Dynamics and opened her first reading institute in Washington in 1959.